Thursday, September 14

Technology Snafus

This just in from Amy, King's Meadow's office manager:

Craziness! That's what ultimately happens this time of year when new things are beginning and you think you can at least rely on the constancy of the old things when life gets overwhelming. But we should know better. The world never runs according to our best whims and fancies even in the blessed realm of ministry. We'd like to make note that while God has called us to take dominion over our tools, occasionally--since we live and work in this poor fallen world--our tools take dominion over us. We are working tirelessly to redeem the days and to set nature (and technology) back in its place as servant rather than task master. We ask you to bear with us as all of the last few months of e-mail correspondence has been wiped from our main office computer and web server. And if you have been in touch with us recently and not received a reply, do try again and except our apologies for the inconvenience. For further questions or follow-ups, e-mail our office at: office@kingsmeadow.com

Just a note of clarification: it is probably best to never, ever, let a PC-only techie mess with a Mac. Invariably, when they mess up, they really, really mess up. And then, they blame it on the Mac. Fortunately, I work with my tech friend and partner Matt, who is a pretty capable switch-hitter. But, Amy, who offices a couple of miles away at the study center, called in a PC guru to work on her nifty new MacBook and kaboom! As Amy says, this is just one of the woes of living and working in this poor fallen world.

So, if you have sent in speaker requests, e-mail queries, or other correspondence via the web, it is likely that your records have disappeared into tiny fragments of indecipherable 0s and 1s. Please contact us again.

7 comments:

Rob Scott said...

I feel your pain!

Speaking of technology, George, what is your reaction to this article: Microsoft designs a school system? Personally (as a techie) I was both intrigued and appalled.

Suzi said...

Rob, I saw that article about the Microsoft school. My first thought was, "Gee, I wonder what Dr. Grant would think of this?" Then I opened this last month's Table Talk magazine and lo and behold, Dr. Grant had an article about education there. He answered almost all my questions in the space of just three pages. You ought to get it and read it. It is classic Dr. Grant.

George said...

Rob: There are two things that strike me regarding the Microsoft school. The first is the general recognition that education in American government-run, tax-funded schools are dysfunctional at best. The second is that while the level of technology and the focused task-orientation of the curriculum is probably better than the curriculum model they replaced, they still do not teach students how to think, how to discern, how to problem-solve, how to understand the world in which they live. Thus, the reforms Microsoft has attempted are starting in the right direction, but they will inevitably fall short. Gizmos are great. I love them. But, gizmos are no substitute for the basics of great art, music, literature, and ideas.

Lawrence Underwood said...

Amen, Dr. Grant. When I was in college it always struck me how many of my fellow students had critical thinking skills. And, I attended a school that had relatively high entrance standards at the time. Now I look back on those days with fondness. In my work with students and young adults I find that have almost no skills in logical thought. This leads to perpetual ignorance at and slavish followershp. I'm of the opinion that one area of ministry in the congregation should be that of correcting this among our young ones.

Lawrence Underwood said...

That shouuld have read, 'how few of my fellow students had critical thinking skills'.

Lawrence Underwood said...

And that should have read, 'should'. Gee Wiz!

Rob Scott said...

George, I agree completely. Gadgets are wonderful tools when used properly. But when used improperly, or too much, they are distractions and time-wasters. Worse, we allow the affable electronic muddle to mold our own thinking patterns. Focused thought? Why should I ... oh look! Something shiny!

My other impression was that their only goal was to turn students into employees rather than help them to become people first, and employable second.